Program Benefits

Unique Blend of Mindset with Academics 

We introduce children to not only  engineering and design, but also the mental framework that leads to success. Our program brings together:

Growth Mindset: We teach specific strategies to help children look at failure as a way to grow.

STEAM: Our program is aligned with NGSS science standards and Common Core Math. We cover 100% if the K-5 Engineering Design Standards.

Making: Each lesson revolves around an engaging hands-on Makerspace challenge.

Design Thinking: We teach children the Stanford Design Thinking process to develop creative solutions to the challenges.

SEL: As a part of our Growth Mindset curriculum, we teach emotional regulation and strategies for successful collaboration.

 

 

 

Impact on Children 

Here are 3 specific things we hear from teachers who have implemented Imagineerz@School:

  • Through the making and design thinking, children learn to learn to think outside the box.
  • Children who typically succeed in academic environments get to experience failure and learn to rebound.
  • Conversely, children who struggle in traditional academic settings get a confidence boost and an opportunity to shine through the hands-on projects.

According to a report by the Institute for the Future (IFTF), 85% of the jobs in 2030 haven’t been invented yet!! To be prepared, what our children are going to need more than knowledge itself, is the ability to acquire new knowledge, navigate uncertainties, and solve problems. That is what we provide through Imagineerz!

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We do Growth Mindset right: 

At Imagineerz, we teach children specific language, strategies and tools to overcome challenges – and when they experience success, that leads to increased confidence and belief in their abilities.

We teach children child-friendly strategies that make the concept of overcoming an obstacle less daunting.

Our consistent use of phrases such as “Stop Sign” helps kids identify what is pulling them behind and how to overcome it – whether they are struggling with their cardboard creations or their academic achievements.